Breathing excercise

The Healing Power of Sound Intensive Meditation Experience

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Crystal Singing Bowls Mind/Body Connection

Healing Pathways is very excited to bring you the crystal bowls to bring balance to your mind, body, and spirit. The bowls are pure crystal and tuned to specific frequencies and chakras to enhance the meditator’s experience, taking you deeper into meditation. Most ancient cultures used the magical power of sound to heal and to bring the body back into resonant balance. Regardless of your level of meditation practice, the crystal bowls will assist you in reducing stress, anxiety, and pain, promote happiness, peace of mind, and help you hear the music of your life-purpose.

Come and learn to open up to your deeper wise self while resonating with the healing sounds of the crystal bowls. Regardless of your level of meditation practice you will be able to experience a richer grounding, healing and/or connection to your higher source. Mindful practitioners of all levels are welcome to come and enjoy this unique meditative experience. Feel free to bring a blanket and pillow for the meditation portion of the program.

Given her background in evidenced-based healing models, Dr. Leona Kashersky is presenting this ancient practice of crystal singing bowls, chakral system theory, rhythm and mantra meditation with the modern principles of EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing). This fusion of past, present and future is sure to enhance your inner work of integrating your heart and mind at a serene location provided by Healing Pathways.

Stay Tuned! Next event date to be posted soon!

For registration call: 916-595-7233
Email soundhealinghpps@gmail.com for registration details
Cost $140 3 hour instruction and experiential didactic.

 

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Join Healing Pathways Psychological Services at the 2017 Healing Arts Festival!

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The Healing Arts FestivalHAF-Favicon, originally called Intuitive Healing Arts Festival, was created back in 1999 and has always been a place to find top quality psychics & healers, new thought, and ancient traditions. We pride ourselves on having the best of the best in the metaphysical and holistic community and continue to expand with new offerings. The spiritual journey is exciting. At the Healing Arts Festival, we respect all seekers as they travel their paths. The Healing Arts Festival is a forum to discover resources for your journey of personal growth. We create a safe and uplifting environment, and have zero tolerance for immoral interpersonal behavior or business practices.

spiral in natureThe Spiral is seen in nature, art, and ancient culture. In 3 dimensions it is known as a helix and can be seen in our DNA or the galaxy. The spiral symbolizes our spiritual journey from healing and rebirth into wisdom and compassion. It leads us from ego consciousness to cosmic awareness, from the inner world to the outer world, and represents the ever expanding consciousness.

About The Owner/Producer:

Prasanna Hankins

Prasanna Hankins is a healer and entrepreneur in the metaphysical community. She is a disciple of Paramhansa Yogananda and has been practicing and teaching his healing techniques for over 10 years.

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The Healing Power of Sound

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The Healing Power of Sound

Photo credit: Blue Heron Crystals and Minerals

by Dr. Leona Kashersky & Nicolina Santoro, MA

The crystal bowls can assist in reducing stress, anxiety, and pain, promote happiness, peace of mind, and help you hear the music of your life-purpose.

The next class is on May 27th at Healing Pathways Psychological Services. 

For registration call: 916-595-7233
Email soundhealinghpps@gmail.com for registration details
Cost $140 3 hour instruction and experiential didactic

Please enjoy the following snapshot of some of the theory and practice used in the facilitation of sound healing at Healing Pathways! 

The Chakra System, in yogic practice

The seven chakras, in the yogic tradition are the centers in our bodies in which life sustaining energy flows through.It is thought that blocked energy in our seven chakras can often lead to illness, so it’s important to understand what each chakra represents and what we can do to keep this energy flowing freely.

The Chakras In Summary

  • Root Chakra — Represents our foundation and feeling of being grounded.
  • Location: Base of spine in tailbone area.
  • Emotional issues: Survival issues such as financial independence, money and food.

 

  • Sacral Chakra — Our connection and ability to accept others and new experiences.
  • Location: Lower abdomen, about two inches below the navel and two inches in.
  • Emotional issues: Sense of abundance, well-being, pleasure and sexuality.

 

  • Solar Plexus Chakra — Our ability to be confident and in control of our lives.
  • Location: Upper abdomen in the stomach area.

Emotional issues: Self-worth, self-confidence and self-esteem.

  • Heart Chakra — Our ability to love.
  • Location: Center of chest just above the heart.
  • Emotional issues: Love, joy and inner peace.

 

  • Throat Chakra — Our ability to communicate.
  • Location: Throat, just above the collar bone.
  • Emotional issues: Communication, self-expression of feelings and the truth.

 

  • Third Eye Chakra — Our ability to focus on and see the big picture.
  • Location: Forehead between the eyes (also called the Brow Chakra).
  • Emotional issues: Intuition, imagination, wisdom and the ability to think and make decisions.

 

  • Crown Chakra — The highest chakra represents our ability to be fully connected spiritually.
  • Location: The very top of the head.
  • Emotional issues: Inner and outer beauty, our connection to spirituality, wonder, and pure bliss.

 

EMDR 

EMDR is an acronym for Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing, a tool to process traumatic experience. EMDR works through bilateral neural stimulation or brain stimulation to integrate traumatic material. The singing crystal bowls create a sense of bilateral stimulation, while the meditation focuses on reprocessing, and altering core belief patterns. The bilateral processing is not only possible using the eyes; we can use sound, touch, and movement of any bilaterally moving body parts with a split timed rhythm. Some psychologists conceptualize EMDR as a form of ‘Exposure Therapy’, desensitizing people to traumatic material and thus relating it to exposure therapy. A more accurate description would be that it integrates the traumatic material.

“Memories evolve and change. Immediately after a memory is laid down, it undergoes a lengthy process of integration and reinterpretation—a process that automatically happens in the mind/brain without any input from the conscious self. When the process is complete, the experience is integrated with other life events and stops having a life of its own. As we have seen, in PTSD this process fails and the memory remains stuck—undigested and raw.” ~ by Bessel Van Der Kolkata, M.D. In The Body Keeps the Score chapter entitled Letting Go of the Past: EMDR

 

Three summarizing factors about EMDR:

  1. EMDR loosens up something in the mind/brain that gives people rapid access to loosely associated memories and images from their past. This seems to help them put traumatic experience into a larger context or perspective.
  2. People may be able to heal from trauma without talking about it. EMDR allows them to observe their experiences in a new way, without verbal give-and-take with another person.
  3. EMDR can help even if the patient and the therapist do not have a trusting relationship. This is intriguing because trauma, understandably, rarely leaves people with an open, trusting heart.

 

 

Physiological and Therapeutic Effects of Drumming

Recent studies have shown physiological benefits to drumming meditation practices such as, the reduction of the physical symptoms of anxiety, stress, the body’s immune system, brainwave activity, dual cerebral hemisphere activation, and connection with the present moment.

Because of the deep sense of tranquility that the act of drumming facilitates within the Central Nervous System, the effects of stress, and the accumulation of trauma stored within our cellular memory can be processed and integrated through this non-confrontational and deeply personal act even in group settings. This form of mindfulness based attention has also shown to activate the cells themselves, allowing for deep trauma to be released from cellular memory with little interference from the mind’s protective measures and defenses as the trauma is engaged and released by group participants. The chemical messengers of the brain or neurotransmitters reinforce this practice by stimulating alpha wave activity, inducing feelings of well-being and happiness.

The shared experience of drumming in groups is observed to facilitate a shared space of connection and consciousness among its members, alleviating common feelings of isolation, social fear, and inhibition.

Drumming seems to provide a platform for people to experience religious or spiritual connection through a universal practice that has been used by all cultures in some form or another. Through this connection, a space is created to access the deepest parts of our human condition.

 

 

References

  • The Body Keeps the Score science grounding in sound, breathe, and movement as a healing modality. Bessel Van Der Kolkata, M.D
  • R. Damasio, The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion and the Making of Consciousness (New York: Random House, 2000) 28
  • K. Holzel, et al., “Mindfulness Practice Leads to Increases in Regional Brain Grey Matter Density,” Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging 191, no. 1 (2011): 36-43.
  • K. Holzel, et al., “Stress Reduction Correlates with Structural Changes in the Amygdala,” Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 5, no. 1 (2010): 11-17.
  • W. Lazar, et al., “Meditation Experience Is Associated with Increased Cortical Thickness,” NeuroReport 16 (2005): 1893-97. Pesso
  • N. Demos, Getting Started with Neurofeedback (New York: W.W. Norton, 2005).
  • J. Davidson, “ Affective Style and Affective Disorders: Prospectives from Affective Neuroscience,” Cognition and Emotion 12, no. 3 (1998): 307-30.
  • J. Davidson, et al, “Regional Brain Function, Emotion and Disorders of Emotion,” Current Opinion of Neurobiology 9 (1999): 228-34.
  • Bittman, M.D., Barry, Karl T. Bruhn, Christine Stevens, MSW, MT-BC, James Westengard, Paul O Umbach, MA, “Recreational Music-Making, A Cost-Effective Group Interdisciplinary Strategy for Reducing Burnout and Improving Mood States in Long-Term Care Workers,” Advances in Mind-Body Medicine, Fall/Winter 2003, Vol. 19 No. 3/4.
  • Winkelman, Michael, Shamanism: The Neural Ecology of Consciousness and Healing. Westport, Conn: Bergin & Garvey; 2000.
  • Bittman, M.D., Barry, “Composite Effects of Group Drumming…,” Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine; Volume 7, No. 1, pp. 38-47; January 2001.
  • Winkelman, Michael, Shamanism: The Neural Ecology of Consciousness and Healing. Westport, Conn: Bergin & Garvey; 2000.
  • Friedman, Robert Lawrence, The Healing Power of the Drum. Reno, NV: White Cliffs; 2000.
  • Mikenas, Edward, “Drums, Not Drugs,” Percussive Notes. April 1999:62-63.
  • Diamond, John, The Way of the Pulse – Drumming with Spirit, Enhancement Books, Bloomingdale IL. 1999.
  • Winkelman, Michael, “Complementary Therapy for Addiction: Drumming Out Drugs,” American Journal of Public Health; Apr 2003, Vol. 93 Issue 4, p647, 5p
  • Mikenas, Edward, “Drums, Not Drugs,” Percussive Notes. April 1999:62-63.
  • Friedman, Robert Lawrence, The Healing Power of the Drum. Reno, NV: White Cliffs; 200

 

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Tonglen: A Buddhist Meditation Practice

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photo by Emily Roesly

Positive visualizing creates the reality you want!                                                (Photo by Emily Roesly, via morguefile)

by Nicolina M. Cahouette, M.A., M.F.T.I #77972

The Meditative Breath Practice of Tonglen involves visualizing a person who you believe is in pain or has caused you pain.  Contrary to our habit of avoiding pain, Tonglen invites us to breath in the pain we are perceiving.  Our bodies become “conversion machines”, and we use our out breath to release the pain, extending a frequency of love toward the person we are trying to help or forgive.

Pema Chodron explains how this simple act, rooted in awareness, broadens our understanding connectedness and human suffering, because we reinforce the reality of an empathetic connection as we visualize while breathing in.

According to The Tibetan Book of the Dead by Sogyal Rinpoche, Tonglen is effective in negating the restricting and sometimes detrimental influence of our ego because it  opens our hearts to those around us and encourages us to help others  without losing ourselves in their personal dramas. We are compassionate observers, and teachers who are also learning how the people around us are effected by their own suffering (1993, p.195).

Visualization is a powerful part of this practice, and it has a number of cognitive benefits. Continually visualizing scenes which evoke positive emotional states reinforces the production of neurotransmitters in the brain associated with positive emotional states. Further, it encourages the pruning of synaptic relationships that are counterproductive.

Tonglen Breathing Exercise SANYO DIGITAL CAMERA

It is important to be in a quiet comfortable place where you can assume a comfortable posture.  Remember, comfortable for your body! You can sit on a cushion, on the floor, or on a chair.  Choose what is best for you. As this is a breath awareness exercise, it can be helpful to place your hand on your stomach to increase awareness of your diaphragm moving in and out with each breath.

While inhaling, visualize the pain associated with what you are trying to release around a specific person. Any confrontations or experiences that were especially salient to you will be a good fit for this exercise.

While exhaling, visualize having a positive healing experience with this person, that love is flowing from you, to the subject of your practice. This practice is a process of thought transmutation that encourages emotional healing around a person or experience.

A good rule of thumb when adopting any meditation practice is to accept that you may find it difficult to focus while you are experiencing the miscellaneous thought traffic that will drift in and out of your meditation time. Also, if you are a novice meditator, keep it brief at first. Start with 10 minute increments once daily until you can sit with ease, then increase the time in 5 or 10 minute intervals until you find what amount of time gives you the maximum ease and benefit.  Want some help?  Try this guided version with Dr. Miles Neale 

Rinpoche, S. (1993). The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying. (p. 195).

NY:Harper Collins.

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